Into the last 8 weeks of training!

Fingers crossed you are all seeing the benefits of the plan and are feeling a bit zippier in your running?

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[BEGINNERS] – Next #DublinMarathon block of training, Weeks 10-14

So how is everyone getting on? Sorry I need to be quicker getting these reports done, the weeks are flying by and we are looking at single digits shortly!! 🙂

We are busy building some extras into the various plans. What we want to do is start you thinking about realistic and potential targets or more accurately figuring out what pace to run your first marathon at.

To do this we will need your feedback over the program. Ideally the forum is the best place for discussion and chat to take place and it is where we will compile a ‘race pace’ zone for you to go with.

How are we doing this?

Well there are plenty of races on most weekend and the best way to figure these things out is under race conditions. If you are disciplined enough you may get a reasonable estimation from a hard workout but racing is best. So target races and distances are going to be placed into the schedules, let us know (on the forum) where you are located and others can help you find events to partake in.

So onwards for the next block!

 BEGINNERS  M  T  W  Th  F  S  S
 Week 13 – July 27 Rest 6  10 5 Rest 8 16
 Week 12 Rest 7  10 7 Rest  8 18
 Week 11 Rest 5 10 8  Rest 8 20
 Week 10 Rest 8  10 8  Rest 16* 5
 Week 9 Rest 8  8 8  Rest 8 22

Notes:

All distance are in kilometers (km / k) at no point do we use miles or mph to designate speed, distance or pace!

‘Rest’ is ‘rest from running’ NOT sit on the sofa and eat crisps and ice-cream. Go for a swim, a nice walk, easy cycle. You should also consider flexibility exercises like pilates or yoga on these ‘Rest’ days.

While we are still doing steady pace runs, now is the time to introduce a little bit of pace to your training. From now on the Thursday run should be considered a ‘Tempo’ Session.

The first 2k should be easy warmup pace, the last 1k should be winding down too cool. The bit in the middle should be at your 10k pace (which you established a couple of weeks ago, right? 🙂 )

*This session is ideally a planned race of 10miles, your finish time from this will be an indication of where your marathon pace should sit.

In the RACE you should be racing. Effort should be high and you are striving to get the best out out your running. It is not a run for the sake of a run, it should be tough. Warm up properly (happy to advise) and cool down properly. 

Happy running!! 🙂

Edel & Sean

 

[INTERMEDIATE] #DublinMarathon running program – Weeks 5-9

 

Ready to go again?

Hopefully the first block tied in with your current running and all that has happened is a little bit of structure and routine has been applied to your weeks.

We’re going to introduce a little bit of speed work at this stage to see where you are at. This is being developed a little bit more in the Experienced plan but to outline –

FAST here is what you are thinking your Marathon Pace (MP) is likely to be. By running a few sessions at this stage you will quickly learn how realistic your anticipated goals are. Run the MP as a block so for example the first 8k on Wednesday should be warmup 2 k, next 1k at steady pace, 4k at MP, 1k cooldown.

Try and take a split or lap time for your MP sections so you can gauge the MP. It should feel like an effort but you should also bear in mind, this will be a pace you hope to hold in 18 weeks time for 42.2k 🙂

We really could do with your feedback on the forum on this so that you can adjust properly.

IMPROVERS  M  T  W  Th  F  S  S
 Week 18 Rest 6  8 (4k at MP) 6 Rest  6 12 (5k at MP)
 Week 17 Rest 10 10 6 Rest 6 16
 Week 16 Rest 6  10 (5k at MP) 6  Rest 10 20
 Week 15 Rest 10  10 (Hilly) 6  Rest 6 24
 Week 14 10 Rest 10 (x4 1k repeats at 5k pace) 10  Rest 6 28

Notes:

All distance are in kilometers (km / k) at no point do we use miles or mph to designate speed, distance or pace!

All runs must start with 10mins / 2k of easy running to warm up and loosen out. Think about your form, relaxing the shoulders etc before getting into the main body of the run.

Control your running so you are not running Threshold all the time. Think “base weeks”. Plenty of time for fast running!!

‘Rest’ is ‘rest from running’ NOT sit on the sofa and eat crisps and ice-cream. Go for a swim, a nice walk, easy cycle. You should also consider flexibility exercises like pilates or yoga on these ‘Rest’ days.

These are starting to introduce pace work. Also coming in is hilly work to build strength. Hills should be something you are being challenged on, but not having to climb! If you can find a hill or drag that takes a few minutes to run up like the hill at Renville Park make it a favourite and mark it for future reference.

Any questions please feel free to fire them at us.

Happy running!! 🙂

Edel & Sean

 

[BEGINNERS] – Ready for the next #DublinMarathon block of training? Weeks 5-9

 

So how is everyone getting on?

Hopefully you are in a nice solid habit of regular running and the past few weeks have been fun, without putting you under too much pressure?

We are busy building some extras into the various plans. What we want to do is start you thinking about realistic and potential targets or more accurately figuring out what pace to run your first marathon at.

To do this we will need your feedback over the program. Ideally the forum is the best place for discussion and chat to take place and it is where we will compile a ‘race pace’ zone for you to go with.

How are we doing this?

Well there are plenty of races on most weekend and the best way to figure these things out is under race conditions. If you are disciplined enough you may get a reasonable estimation from a hard workout but racing is best. So target races and distances are going to be placed into the schedules, let us know (on the forum) where you are located and others can help you find events to partake in.

So onwards for the next block!

 BEGINNERS  M  T  W  Th  F  S  S
 Week 18 5 Rest  6 2 Rest 8k RACE Rest or 4*
 Week 17 Rest 5  8 5 Rest  5 8
 Week 16 Rest 5 8 8  Rest 8 8
 Week 15 Rest 8  8 Rest  5 Rest 10k RACE
 Week 14 Rest 8  8 8  Rest 8 14

Notes:

All distance are in kilometers (km / k) at no point do we use miles or mph to designate speed, distance or pace!

‘Rest’ is ‘rest from running’ NOT sit on the sofa and eat crisps and ice-cream. Go for a swim, a nice walk, easy cycle. You should also consider flexibility exercises like pilates or yoga on these ‘Rest’ days.

*Don’t be lazy!! 😉

These are all easy base runs for this block (apart from the races). Don’t worry about speed, breathing, pacing. They are steady runs to get the legs used to running. Speed work will be introduced later.

In the RACE you should be racing. Effort should be high and you are striving to get the best out out your running. It is not a run for the sake of a run, it should be tough. Warm up properly (happy to advise) and cool down properly. Remember your times from each race and we can use these to figure out where you are and what your potential may be in 18 weeks time!!! 🙂

Have a good weekend and a solid start into the next block on Monday.

 

Happy running!! 🙂

Edel & Sean

 

An Epic #running Triumph!!

We had a great opportunity to try out some pairs of the new Saucony Triumph ISO and invited everyone to come along and join in the fun.

Continue reading “An Epic #running Triumph!!”

[EXPERIENCED] #AKWest Dublin Marathon Program – Weeks 0-4 or 23-19

Welcome to the Experienced Marathoner program.

You have several done, a couple of years marathon running under your belt and are getting to a point of possible frustration with a lack of further improvements?

We’re about to get you down off that plateau and smash those limitations!! 🙂

Your Training Plan is a little more complex than the programs that we have laid out for the Beginners and Improvers (naturally enough) so for ease of management we are using the power of the Cloud to allow us to edit and adjust the program whilst leaving it accessible to you!

So with that in mind please follow me down the rabbit hole to your new plan…Experienced Runners Plan (worth bookmarking this link in your ‘Training’ folder on the desktop). 

Dave will be updating the blocks there on an ongoing basis and depending on the outcome of the poll below (please contribute) can fill in the blanks regarding effort, pace and all that side of it. There are a couple of prep weeks with some key session such as the HR Field Testing (please do this fresh so rest Monday).

If you already have zones set by Matt Bidwell it is worth doing this field test as a back up to the existing zones. Any queries….ask Dave! 🙂

On that note it is time to point you towards the Coaches Corner where you can find out a little more about David and his contact details for obtaining personalised plans and coaching.

There will be no group run next week as both Edel & I will be recovering from our Adventure over the weekend and it is unlikely we will be fit to walk nevermind run! 🙂

Have a good weekend and a solid start on Tuesday.

 

Happy running!! 🙂

Edel, Sean & Dave

PS. a quick poll on what you think we should do to manage discussion. We would like for you to be able to find the answers to the most frequently asked questions as they arise along the way. We think either the Google+ Community  or a separate forum would be ideal but what do you think?:

[IMPROVERS] #AKWest Dublin Marathon Program – Weeks 0-4 or 23-19

So, you have tackled a few marathons already and want to go again. What happened to “Never again!!” ? 🙂

Never running

Having done a few marathons before or you are an experienced runner with plenty of miles already under your belt you will have a fair idea of what to expect in 22 weeks as you toe the start line.

Along the way we hope to help structure your training and possibly add to your existing knowledge base or possibly remind you of some things you forgot along the way (like “never again!”). Fingers crossed the extra structured sessions, group runs and seminars on nutrition, strength & conditioning, flexibility etc that we will be hosting will be of benefit to you, reinforcing that will to run.

Regardless of the how or why you want to run Dublin Marathon in October our goal here is to deliver you to the Start line in 22 weeks in good enough condition that you are raring to go and that you hit the finish line at or under your goal.

In this improver’s group we are going to talk about paces, pacing, goal times, nutrition and racing strategy. All of this will be conversational and hopefully in a manner that it becomes a resource for you and others.

This marathon is going to be the one you really get to grip with and start to realise your potential as a runner. The sessions, especially when we start introducing speed sessions will be there to challenge you. It is up to you to challenge yourself and work hard.

The harder you work in the preparation months, the better the result on the day.

Now, you should have a target time in mind. It should be a healthy and realistic target. There is no point rocking up here looking to go from a 4:30 marathon to 3:05 the structure of this simply won’t allow for such a dramatic change. These program’s are incremental. If you have the potential for that sort of improvement taking a look at the Experienced Group and interacting with one of the Coaches (outside coaches – not us) regarding a customised plan based on your race results may be the way to go for you.

You are welcome to dip in and out of the various groups to read what is going on, you will notice a difference in tone from one group to the next. All of the stuff, Beginner / Improver / Experienced is going to be in the Public domain (here in posts, or possibly on a forum we might use and in the news emails) so you are free to browse.

What we don’t want you to do is mix and match the workouts!! It might look ok, but the plans are independent of each other and should be approached as such.

So.

Hopefully you are still running and keeping the miles in the legs, ideally have a half marathon (or 2)  already under your belt this year. To be 100% honest some of these early weeks will be beyond some of you, but that is fine, simply play along and let the structure take over again, we’ll have you humming a tune in no time!! 🙂

Our week starts on Monday, you can shift the schedule to suit your timeline, school, work, kids etc. You can run morning or night. As and when you see fit. What you won’t do (please) is shift runs around or skip rest days. Pile too much running together and you can forget about running this marathon. You will likely get injured (again different with the Experienced group who may be running 6 days). This is what I mean by read it but don’t mix & match the different plans.

So nice and easy into it!

IMPROVERS  M  T  W  Th  F  S  S
 Week 23 5 Rest  5 5 Rest  5 8
 Week 22 8 Rest  8 8 Rest 8 10
 Week 21 8 Rest  8 8  Rest 8 10
 Week 20 8 Rest  10 10  Rest 8 (w 2k fast in mid) 12
 Week 19 8 Rest 10 10  Rest 8 (w 2k fast in mid) 12

Notes:

All distance are in kilometers (km / k) at no point do we use miles or mph to designate speed, distance or pace!

All runs must start with 10mins of easy running to warm up and loosen out. Think about your form, relaxing the shoulders etc before getting into the main body of the run.

Control your running so you are not running Threshold all the time. Think “base weeks”. Plenty of time for fast running!!

‘Rest’ is ‘rest from running’ NOT sit on the sofa and eat crisps and ice-cream. Go for a swim, a nice walk, easy cycle. You should also consider flexibility exercises like pilates or yoga on these ‘Rest’ days.

These are all easy base runs for this block. Don’t worry about speed, breathing, pacing. They are steady runs to get the legs used to running. If you are using a HRM most of this will be Zone 2 & 3 at most. More detailed speed work will be introduced later.

There is no group run next week as both of us will be recovering from our Adventure over the weekend and it is unlikely we will be fit to walk nevermind run! 🙂

Have a good weekend and a solid start on Monday.

 

Happy running!! 🙂

Edel & Sean

PS. a quick poll on what you think we should do to manage discussion. We would like for you to be able to find the answers to the most frequently asked questions as they arise along the way. We think either the Google+ Community  or a separate forum would be ideal but what do you think?:

[BEGINNERS] #AKWest Dublin Marathon Program – Weeks 0-4 or 23-19

If Dublin Marathon is the first marathon that you are aiming to tackle, you really would find it hard to pick a better event to lose your marathon cherry to. In making the decision to register for Dublin (or about to do so) you may already have heard about the atmosphere of the day, and if you haven’t you will!! 🙂

Regardless of the how or why you have come to this decision our goal here is to deliver you to the Start line in 22 weeks in good enough condition that you make it to the finish line!

In this beginners group we are not going to talk about paces, or goal times, or anything like that. Your first marathon is one to enjoy, it is also one to complete.

Not saying there are none among you that won’t have a time in mind, you will, and it is healthy to have a target, we just don’t want you obsessing about it. That is where the Improver’s Group comes into play 😉

You are welcome to dip in and out of the various groups to read what is going on, you will notice a difference in tone from one group to the next. All of the stuff, Beginner / Improver / Experienced is going to be in the Public domain (here in posts, or possibly on a forum we might use and in the news emails) so you are free to browse.

What we don’t want you to do is mix and match the workouts!! It might look ok, but the plans are independent of each other and should be approached as such.

So.

Hopefully you are already running, you are comfortable running 5k, probably 10k and ideally have a half marathon under your belt. These help (A) with experience and (B) preparing your body for the coming months.

Our week starts on Monday, you can shift the schedule to suit your timeline, school, work, kids etc. You can run morning or night. As and when you see fit. What you won’t do (please) is shift runs around or skip rest days. Pile too much running together and you can forget about running this marathon. You will likely get injured (again different with the Experienced group who may be running 6 days). This is what I mean by read it but don’t mix & match the different plans.

So nice and easy into it!

 BEGINNERS  M  T  W  Th  F  S  S
 Week 23 2 Rest  2 2 Rest  2 4
 Week 22 3 Rest  3 3 Rest  3 6
 Week 21 3 Rest  6 3  Rest 6 6
 Week 20 6 Rest  8 6  Rest 8 8
 Week 19 6 Rest  8 8  Rest 8 10

Notes:

All distance are in kilometers (km / k) at no point do we use miles or mph to designate speed, distance or pace!

‘Rest’ is ‘rest from running’ NOT sit on the sofa and eat crisps and ice-cream. Go for a swim, a nice walk, easy cycle. You should also consider flexibility exercises like pilates or yoga on these ‘Rest’ days.

These are all easy base runs for this block. Don’t worry about speed, breathing, pacing. They are steady runs to get the legs used to running. Speed work will be introduced later.

There is no group run next week as both of us will be recovering from our Adventure over the weekend and it is unlikely we will be fit to walk nevermind run! 🙂

Have a good weekend and a solid start on Monday.

 

Happy running!! 🙂

Edel & Sean

PS. a quick poll on what you think we should do to manage discussion. We would like for you to be able to find the answers to the most frequently asked questions as they arise along the way. We think either the Google+ Community  or a separate forum would be ideal but what do you think?:

Dam Buster (Part 3) – The Aftermath

I didn’t plan on a long drawn out #racereport, it’s just happened that way.

Post #AmsterdamMarathon I was bitterly disappointed with the mess that I made of the race. I was blaming pacers, my coach was blaming pacers, and while they are to blame for going off far too hard, I am the person who should take the blame for not trusting myself.

If you missed them: 
Dam Buster (Part 1)
Dam Buster (Part 2) – The Bad

Lesson were learned and some valuable notes made for the next one. And, yes, definitely there will be a next one!

(At time of writing I had feelers out for Dublin Marathon and while I was offered numbers, nothing came of it on the day, coach was eager to have me run 3:20 with him as pacer.)

A week on now since I’ve been home and I’ve thought about it a bit. I don’t dwell too much on negatives in any event and (almost) always look for a positive outcome from everything.

Nothing in the build up will be changed. My race day evolved as a response to my training which went 100% as planned. Yes, I skipped a couple of sessions, went too hard on others, and should really have stuck to the full taper plan but this had no bearing on my race.

Unless you are running +Dublin Marathon do not rely on the pacers*. Trust yourself, use the pacers as a guide to how you are going but do not depend on them. Don’t be afraid to ask questions of them. I should have asked why are we running so fast early on. Pacers are human and make mistakes too.

I will definitely consider a waterbottle or small backpack in my next marathon. I trained pretty dry and empty for a lot of the recovery runs in training and only on the long runs would I set out a bottle of water and carry gels. Rehearse your race day preparations in your long runs. Congested water stations with flimsy cups don’t work when you are on a goal. I’m not a pusher and shover so I’m better to be self sufficient entirely and run on the other side of the road, avoiding the scrum.

With no bearing on race day performance do not underestimate the usefulness of black bags. One over the shoulders will keep you surprisingly warm on the start line and one over your hips like a skirt makes for a useful personal urinal in a pinch (just don’t do it on the track!)

Coach summed it up perfectly and put any doubts to rest in an email he sent me:

The plain and simple fact is the pacers screwed up your race.

I was watching the splits and knew straight away that up to 20k you were on 3:10-12 pace. Really poor by the pacers. Those few minutes may not seem like much but enough to be burning matches and leaving you with the difficult last 12k you suffered through.

3 positives to take are:

1)still a massive pb and something to build off next year

2)you suffered on when many others would have given up and

3) solid build and fitness established for XC and shorter races over Winter 🙂

He’s right. A PB is a PB regardless of everything else and to grab a PB of 28 minutes is a great indicator of how I responded to the training. Maybe I have learned to suffer a bit, but there was no way I was stepping off for a DNF, no way!

The final few points are:
Dutch stairs are not too bad the day after a marathon, once you take them backwards.
Trappist beers are a little strong to be drinking as a ‘recovery’ drink.

The morning after, I think.

Bring your own phone charger as others just don’t work with Blackberry (alternatively change your phone to something other than Blackberry)

That’s it, that’s a wrap!

See you next time, it’s my time to start running again.

*Dublin pacers are awesome.

Dam Buster (Part 2) – The Bad

Last week the first part of my #AmsterdamMarathon report was put out Dam Buster (Part 1) and I left you all hanging around in a hotel room. Sorry about that!

There was a reason for that. This part of the event did not go to plan and with +Dublin Marathon on last Monday I didn’t want to be putting out negative vibes for anyone who was following the Marathon Program on the +Amphibian King West Facebook page or any readers tackling their first marathon.

Sunday morning we were away bright and early. Truth be told I don’t sleep well the night before big events, and this is a big event for me. I’m going out having trained hard and trained well for my goal time of a sub 3:15 marathon.

Lets throw perspective on this. My first marathon was 2011 (also with +Conor), I didn’t train properly for that. I felt I’d a decent season of triathlon (70.3 distance) training under my belt and doing a few long runs through September was going to get me through. 4:00 was the goal then, I finished in 4:07.

2012 saw me a little more focused and awar of what I was doing. A pal gifted me a decent training plan and 3:30 was the trainging goal. Everything was going swimmingly until a MTB incident 2 weeks prior took me out of the game entirely. DNF. Lesson learned 😦

 So 3:15 is an ambitious goal, almost an hour off my marathon best, but I’m confident in my training.

Downstairs we went for some breakfast. Couple of eggs, croissants and coffee for me with a yoghurt for good measure. Drinking my #ElivarSport Endure  during the time up to the start would mean energy stores would be topped up.

Aim was to get a taxi down to the Olympic Stadium. A correct assumption that trams would be jammed and ‘standing room only’ meant we arrived in comfort with only a short stroll to the bag drop. Restless energy had me on my feet as we had plenty of time to spare, thankfully it also meant I was in good form for the toilet and off I went before the Queues became massive.

With 30mins to go before the start it was time to drop the bags. I was wearing a beanie and armwarmers, almost a tradition with me at this point in races. I tend to stick the beanie in my waist band and roll the arm warmers down as sweatbands once I’ve warmed up.

We rocked into the stadium where everyone filtered into the centre of the field before dispersing into holding pens for each time slot. We were in the 3:00-3:30 pen with pacers breaking the group into three goal times.

Our pen is to the left.

The atmosphere was electric in the stadium. Music pumping out, everyone nervously nodding and smiling at each other. As the countdown announced 4 mins to start, people shuffled forwards into position behind their pacers.

(It was at this point I realised the benefit of wearing black bin bags, there was a sprinkling of ‘water’ on the track beside me)

The air filled with tops, bags, bottles all being pitched to the side into the centre arena. Watching the big screen we could see the official starter and BANG!! off they went at the start.

Watching the thing on the screen you are removed from the moment until suddenly people start shifting and you realise “Oh! Thats us!!” as people drift forward, shuffle, walk and break into a trot. I could see the pacer balloons hitting the first bend ahead of us and wondered why there was no response from the people in front. It was only after a gap appeared that I realised we were being funnelled through a gap in the pen barriers. People were sprinting off from the pen, chasing the pacers.

It was only a minute or so by the time I crossed the start line, but felt like an age! Pushing start on my +Polar it was time to get it on!!

Round the bend and out through the stadium entrance, lots and lots of people jostling around for space ever though I didn’t think it was too congested.

There were quite a few pushing their way up the inside against the barriers. I can’t see the sense of that. Clip a kerb and you’re out before you’ve even done a mile or clip someone’s heels and they’re out.

The course features a section of loop around the city through the Vondelpark back around towards the Oltmpic statium before doing a loop back on itself going down Stationsweg at which stage a roar from Conor across the barriers let me know he was chasing.

The first 5k felt fast. I was putting it down to the route being pancake flat and all of my training being on lumpy West of Ireland roads. It wasn’t that it felt easy, just fast. Going through the 10k mark and checking my times, my watch was +100m but it was accurate enough for me to realise that it was too quick.

TCS Amsterdam Marathon Sean Conroy netto 10KM 45:08. Calculated finish 3:10:36.
— Amphibian King West (@amphkingwest) October 20, 2013

I was off the back of the pacers by 10-15m. I’d closed the gap back up to them over the first 5k, I wasn’t planning on blowing myself up by chasing them hard, I took it steady. But the Twitter feed told the story – through the first 10k at 3:10 pace – wasn’t going to be sustainable.

Experience would have told me to back off, go with how I was feeling. I didn’t spend weeks grooving my legs to a 4:35/km pace for nothing, they were telling me how to run this race and right now they were telling me it’s too fast!!!

Did I listen?

Hell no. I trusted the pacers, they knew something I didn’t, keep them in sight.

Leaving the city we ran out along the Amstel river. This was gorgeous. I’ve seen other reports that criticise this section of the course, but I liked it. Where I was there was space, we were no longer tripping over each other, no more jostling or pushing.

Running along the river bank, it was windy, but scenic in a Dutch kind of way. Some fantastic houses out here and crews out rowing on the river, looking at us bunch of eejits. We were also treated to the biggest +Mizuno Running Rider 17 being carried on a floating Disco!!

Post by Mizuno Running.

Hitting the village of Ouderkerk a/d Amstel (Old Church on the Amstel) we were getting close to half way.

Again the Twitter amchine was spitting out predictions (I was bllissfully unaware of these) once we hit the mid point:

TCS Amsterdam Marathon Sean Conroy netto Half Marathon 1:36:25. Double this to a finish of 3:12:50.
— Amphibian King West (@amphkingwest) October 20, 2013

Still well ahead of trained finish.

This won’t last.

And it didn’t.

As you can see from the image below (blue line indicates Race Pace), literally when I went through 2:00hrs the wheels came off.

 I was sticking to my nutrition plan,  +Agave #9 gels steadily at 0, 10, 15, 20, 25, 35 with some #2nd Surge in reserve for 30 & 40km but there was nothing going to pull me back from the brink once I’d burnt those matches.

At 28k my HR dived off a cliff, the power and speed went from the legs.

Game over.

Time to get the hell out of Dodge and home.

I’ve vague recollections of meandering my way though a business area, trying to pick it up only to fall back again.

I needed to puke.

I couldn’t

Walk, run, walk, wobble, walk, wog. The km’s felt like miles. Coming back into the city the crowds started to build again, I got some energy from this, I jogged, a little, walked more.

I drank that AA rubbish at the water stations, sorry water stop. Get going again.

Somewhere around 34/35k the trooper came by me. ‘Go with him!!’, my head screamed, my legs said ‘F#@k Off!!’

Broken.

Stay ahead of the 3:30 group.

3:30 came and went.

Back in to the Vondelpark. Lots of people shouting and cheering. Damn these bibs with names on them there’s no hiding. “Come on Sean!!”, “You can do it Sean!!”, “Almost there Sean!!”

Damn you all to hell, you made me run again!!

The last km’s were torture.

Come on Sean, there’s the Stadium, make the most of it, don’t quit now. Get there!

Left, right, left, right

I got there. I didn’t ‘SMASH IT!!’. I didn’t break 3:15.

I did finish. I broke 3:40.

27 mins off my previous marathon best time.

The breakdown after the breakdown.
TCS Amsterdam – Summary